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News Release | WashPIRG Foundation | Consumer Protection

30th Annual Survey Finds Dangerous Toys on Store Shelves

Dangerous or toxic toys can still be found on America’s store shelves, according to the Washington Public Interest Research Group (WashPIRG) Foundation 30th annual Trouble in Toyland report. The survey of potentially hazardous toys found that, despite recent progress, consumers must still be wary when shopping this holiday season.

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Blog Post | Consumer Protection

30 Years of "Trouble in Toyland," 30 Years of Safety Improvements | Anna Low-Beer

Every year, U.S. PIRG Education Fund releases Trouble in Toyland, a report on toy safety which examines toys bought at major national retailers, looking for safety hazards including toxic toys, choking hazards, labeling violations, powerful magnets, and excessibely loud toys. We continue to find these hazards on store shelves, which indicates the need for continued vigilance and adequate enforcement of safety regulations. But despite lingering dangers, in the last 30 years, we've come a long way in terms of both policy and compliance with standards.

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News Release | U.S. PIRG | Public Health

Medical Professionals Call for Action to Save Antibiotics

Nearly six hundred medical and health care professionals from across the nation are calling on major restaurant chains to set strong antibiotics policies that protect public health.

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Buying Guide: Meat Raised Without Antibiotics

The World Health Organization, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and experts across the globe warn that antibiotic resistance is a serious and growing threat to public health. What can you do to help? Support meat raised without routine antibiotics to move the marketplace away from a practice that directly contributes to the rise and spread of resistant bacteria. 

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Blog Post | Transportation

Millennials Want More Public Transportation | Sean Doyle

A new poll shows that access to public transportation is “very important” for Millennials in considering where to live and where to work.  The results support our research over the past few years that found Millennials are driving less than older generations and are more prone to walk, bike, or take transit to get where they need to go.

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News Release | WashPIRG Foundation | Democracy

Big Money Playing an Outsized Role in Washington Elections

In Washington’s congressional primaries, bigger wallets give a small set of mega-donors an outsized voice, according to new information released today by the WashPIRG Foundation and Demos. Just 259 donors who gave $1,000 or more to candidates in the primaries outspent the at least 6,233 small donors who gave less than $200, and 57% percent of all candidate contributions came from donors giving chunks of $1,000 or more.

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News Release | WashPIRG Foundation | Transportation

New Report Shows Mounting Evidence of Millennials’ Shift Away from Driving

A new report from the WashPIRG Foundation and the Frontier Group shows mounting evidence that the Millennial generation’s dramatic shift away from driving is likely to continue even as the economy improves.

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News Release | U.S. PIRG | Public Health

Some Good, Some Bad in Obama Executive Order on Protecting Antibiotics

Today, President Barack Obama issued an Executive Order – Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria. While the order takes several important steps necessary to control the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, it misses the opportunity to call for critical reforms in the agricultural sector that are essential to protect public health.

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News Release | WashPIRG Foundation | Transportation

New Study: Traffic Data Does Not Support Spending on Alaskan Way Viaduct Tunnel

A new report by the WashPIRG Foundation calls the proposed Alaskan Way Viaduct tunnel one of 11 examples of wasteful highway spending based on outdated assumptions of ever-increasing driving. The study points to data showing that the financial risks of boring a massive tunnel to replace the damaged and unstable Viaduct hugely outweigh potential benefits. The study calls for the state to consider reprioritizing scarce transportation dollars to other options, including a cheaper combination of surface street and transit options to replace the old earthquake-damaged highway.

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News Release | WashPIRG | Budget, Tax

Offshore Tax Havens Cost Average Washington Taxpayer $1,172 a Year, Washington Small Business $4,166

SEATTLE – As hardworking Americans breathe a sigh of relief getting their taxes in, it’s a good time to be reminded of how ordinary taxpayers pick up the tab for the loopholes in our tax laws. WashPIRG was joined today by Gerald Hankerson, Director of Washington’s Main Street Alliance, and Theo Martin, owner of Island Soul Restaurant, to release a new study which revealed that the average Washington taxpayer in 2013 would have to shoulder an extra $1,172 in taxes to make up for the revenue lost due to the use of offshore tax havens by corporations and wealthy individuals. 

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Report | WashPIRG Foundation | Consumer Protection

Debt Collectors, Debt Complaints

This is the fifth in a series of reports that review complaints to the CFPB nationally and on a state-by-state level. In this report we explore consumer complaints about debt collection, with the aim of uncovering patterns in the problems consumers are experiencing with debt collectors and documenting the role of the CFPB in helping consumers successfully resolve their complaints.

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Report | WashPIRG Foundation | Transportation

A New Course

Universities and colleges across the country are taking steps to encourage their communities, students, faculty and staff to decrease their reliance on personal vehicles. These efforts are working well – saving money for universities, improving the quality of life in college towns, and giving today’s students experience in living life without depending on a personal car. 

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Report | Washington Foundation & WashPIRG Students | Higher Ed

Fixing the Broken Textbook Market

The cost of college textbooks has skyrocketed in recent years. To students and families already struggling to afford high tuition and fees, an additional $1,200 per year on books and supplies can be the breaking point. WashPIRG Foundation - in conjunction with WashPIRG Students and PIRG Students - takes a look at how the price of textbooks are detering students from purchasing assigned materials despite concern for their grades, among other findings. 

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Report | WashPIRG Foundation | Consumer Protection

Credit Cards, Consumer Compliants

This is the fourth in a series of reports that review complaints to the CFPB nationally and on a state-by-state level. In this report we explore consumer complaints about credit cards with the aim of uncovering patterns in the problems consumers are experiencing with their credit cards and documenting the role of the CFPB in helping consumers successfully resolve their complaints. Despite the benefits to consumers brought by enactment of the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure (Credit CARD) Act of 2009, consumer complaints about credit cards remain common. 

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Report | WashPIRG Foundation | Transportation

Transportation In Transition

SEATTLE – A first-of-its-kind report by the WashPIRG Foundation shows reduced car commuting in Washington’s urbanized areas—including the Greater Seattle area, Spokane-Idaho, and Portland-Vancouver—and more use of  transportation alternatives, like public transit and biking. The report looks at how Washington cities stack up with the top 100 urbanized areas in the country.

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Blog Post | Transportation

Testimony of Bruce Speight, WashPIRG Executive Director at a hearing on Senate Transportation Package, SB 5987, House Transportation Committee, 26 March 2015 | Bruce Speight

Despite changing transportation trends, our state’s own revised forecasts, and crumbling infrastructure, this bill significantly increases spending on highway construction and increased lane capacity, while giving short shrift to repair and maintenance and other modes, including transit and biking.

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Blog Post | Public Health

Some Good, Some Bad in Obama Administration Plan to Protect Antibiotics | Sujatha Jahagirdar

Today, the National Task Force for Combatting Resistant Bacteria released a five-year action plan to tackle the growing problem of antibiotic resistance.  While the plan will take several important steps necessary to control the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, it will miss the opportunity to call for critical reforms in the agricultural sector that are essential to protect public health.

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Blog Post | Consumer Protection

President Issues Privacy Platform | Ed Mierzwinski

Today the President announced support for a variety of privacy protections, most of which are laudable. However, it remains our view that Congressional consideration of a "uniform national breach notification standard" is unnecessary and, worse, will give powerful special interests an opportunity to use the proposal as a Trojan Horse to enact sweeping preemptive limits on state privacy protections.

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Blog Post | Financial Reform

House Floor Vote on Budget Delayed over Special Interest "Riders" From Wall Street, Other Powerful Interests | Ed Mierzwinski

UPDATED: Opposition to a controversial provision authored by Citibank forced House leaders to delay consideration of the "CRomnibus" appropriations package just hours before funding for the federal government expired at midnight Thursday. Eventually the bill passed narrowly with the Wall Street provision intact. Action now shifts to the Senate, which has a 48-hour window to pass the bill, but any one Senator can block it under Senate rules. The provision would again allow Wall Street banks to place risky bets with taxpayer-backed funds, and require taxpayers to bail them out if the bets fail, repealing a key protection added in the 2010 Wall Street reform law. 

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Blog Post | Consumer Protection

The CFPB at Three: A Child Prodigy | Ed Mierzwinski

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) turned just three years old Monday, July 21st, but when you look at its massive and compelling body of work, you must wonder: Are watchdog years like plain old dog years? Is the CFPB now a full-sized, 21-year-old adult? The answer is no, not yet. The CFPB is still growing and developing and adding programs and projects. The CFPB is, however, at three years old, certainly a child prodigy. Despite overwhelming public support, however, powerful special interests continue to attack it. Yet, the idea of the CFPB needs no defense, only more defenders.

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Priority Action

We're teaming up with big restaurant chains to stop the overuse of antibiotics on factory farms. Call on KFC to stop selling meat raised on routine antibiotics.

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